FAIR TREATMENT • EQUAL RIGHTS • JUST COMPENSATION

Labor & Unions

Priddy, Cutler, Naake & Meade is the leading labor and employment law firm in Louisville, KY. Our lawyers are dedicated to the representation of organized labor, its leadership and members.

Our experienced attorneys have had numerous trials, arbitrations, and appeals and have litigated on behalf of thousands of employees and their unions.

We are committed to the mission of the American labor movement and improving the lives of working people and their families through fair treatment and equal rights for all employees, union or non-union.

National Labor Relations Act

The National Labor Relations Act (or Wagner Act) is a 1935 United States federal law that limits the means with which employers may react to workers in the private sector that create labor unions, engage in collective bargaining, and take part in strikes and other forms of concerted activity in support of their demands. The Act does not, on the other hand, cover those workers who are covered by the Railway Labor Act, agricultural employees, domestic employees, supervisors, federal, state or local government workers, independent contractors and some close relatives of individual employers.

The NLRA defined and prohibited unfair labor practices including the following:

  • Interfering with, restraining or coercing employees in their rights under Section 7. These rights include freedom of association, mutual aid or protection, self-organization, to form, join, or assist labor organizations, to bargain collectively for wages and working conditions through representatives of their own choosing, and to engage in other protected concerted activities with or without a union.
  • Assisting or dominating a labor organization.
  • Discriminating against employees to encourage or discourage acts support of a labor organization.
  • Discriminating against employees who file charges or testify.

The key principles also include:

  • Protecting a wide range of activities, whether a union is involved or not, in order to promote organization and collective bargaining.
  • Protecting employees as a class and expressly not on the basis of a relationship with an employer.
  • There can be only one exclusive bargaining representative for a unit of employees.
  • Employers have a duty to bargain with the representative of its employees.

Any group of workers may organize or help organize a union, except managers (supervisors) and security guards. *

* Security guards can form their own union – they just can’t be in a union with other employees.

The Rights of Employees

  • The right to form a union
  • The right to join a union
  • The right to strike
  • The right to report unfair labor practices

Employers are Forbidden from the Following Practices

  • Making threats, real or implied, towards employees for union activities
  • Demoting or reprimanding employees for union activities
  • Asking questions of employees concerning union activities
  • Reducing employees pay or benfits for union activities
  • Make promises of promotion or increased benefits of any form to report on union activities
  • Spying or Eavesdropping on any union activity

Attorneys

Alton Priddy
Alton Priddy
Don C. Meade
Don C. Meade
Peter Naake
Peter Naake
Buddy Cutler
Buddy Cutler
Thomas Schulz
Thomas Schulz
David Leightty
David Leightty
Matt Lynch
Matt Lynch
Ben Basil
Ben Basil
Alison Messex
Alison Messex